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Our aim is to raise awareness of the  condition and its many challenges

Our aim is to raise awareness of the
condition and its many challenges

Funding mainstream assistive technology

Funding mainstream
assistive technology

To bring together those living with  the condition, to share experiences

To bring together those living with
the condition, to share experiences

To ease isolation

To ease isolation

To recognise and raise awareness of enabling assistive technologies

To recognise and raise awareness
of enabling assistive technologies

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Molly Watt Trust

Sunday, 09 November 2014 00:00

Dad's First Blog

Written by  Andy Watt
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Well it's high time I tried to put down how I feel about Molly Jane Watt.
I wear the badge with pride which says I've unconditional love for all of our children. Harry was born 26 years ago. Life changed very much once we became parents. Start of unconditional love. Jack born 22 years ago; then the delight of our first girl (Molly). She used to blow raspberries and we didn't realise for sometime that this was because she couldn't hear us so the vibration of these noises were her trying to communicate. She was diagnosed as severely deaf at 18 months.
Jane was devastated and typical of me it "was fine we will deal with it." I actually feel quite guilty that I didn't take this condition anywhere near as seriously as Jane.
I've always tried to find the positive wherever I can. Looking back I feel bad that I didn't support Jane as much as I should have. Of course the past has happened so we can't change it.
That devastating blow to our beautiful little girl changed the whole dynamic of ours lives as we became involved in South East Berks Deaf Children Society. We shook our cans outside shops for any pennies we could get. Early lesson in life. The ones who looked like they'd pop a few pennies in to our cans would cross the street whereas a scruffy looking person would put a fiver in. Very interesting. Fundraising became something we really got into.
Lily came along to complete our wonderful family, 2 boys and 2 girls, perfect.
At age 12 Molly who had mastered a totally normal life with lots of friends and great social skills had an eye test and then we were hit by a proverbial sledgehammer. She was going blind. Hard to put this down in words. Imagine losing your sight and already deaf!
Sight has to be the most precious sense we have. Molly's was going and fast.
It took a little while to tell her.
When Jane told her she didn't make a big deal of it, It was as if she knew and had started to prepare for her new life in the dark!
Since the age of 12 Molly has had to endure visits to Moorfields Eye Hospital to start with every 3 months then twice a year her consultant was Prof Tony Moore along with his team, a wonderful man.
Our fundraising events were galvanised once Molly got diagnosed with Usher Syndrome. I did various challenges and have been supported by some lovely people. We calculated a year or so ago that since Molly was diagnosed deaf we've raised over £50,000 to help support people like Molly. It's a very powerful thing the gift of giving and this gives Jane and I so much pleasure. Making a difference to people with Deafblind issues is what we are all about.
Molly is one amazing young lady. I'm obviously biased but I have to say that with dozens of events we've either organised or been along to where she has spoken it's very humbling to hear and see the feedback.
I'm proud of all of our children and never favour one over the other. With Molly's issues which to this day are very challenging it has meant Jane has had to spend more time and effort with her so to speak.
Molly's best friend Unis her Guide Dog came into her life over 3 years ago and is literally her eyes and often her ears aswell. They are one great team. Molly is on an amazing journey and I've no doubt she will be famous not for any selfish reasons but simply to help others. In her young life (20 now) she's done a lot of living and I'm sure there's plenty more to come. That's it for now as I'll be doing more blogs in the coming weeks, months and years to come as Molly's amazing adventure continues......
 
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