A A A Accessibility A A A A
Items filtered by date: November 2017
Tuesday, 28 November 2017 07:22

Applewatch Down Under

Coming to the end of the school year, I have realised how much I rely on my apple watch. The apple watch has given me so much support that has allowed me to travel to and from my sports as well as keep organised as the school year progressed.
First, haptics has changed my world. I never realised how effective they could be as I never miss a text or a reminder now. I find it very easy now to wake up in the morning to a small vibration on my wrist rather than something that vibrates my whole bed.
The apple watch has also improved my organisation; as it will remind me to do simple things like keep my hearing and vision equipment together. This never used to work, as I would never have my phone on me when the reminder went off. Now that the watch is attached to my wrist, I never miss anything. Also, now whenever I think of something I need to do, I can instantly put it in my watch instead of not having my phone therefore forgetting about the thing I had to do. The apple watch has relieved much of my stress and now I feel much happier and stress-free.
Travelling is something that the apple watch has helped me with. I listen to music while I walk to school and I used to find it a bit nerve wrecking, having to go on my phone to change the song. Now a quick glance at my watch and I change the song. It has become a lot less hazardous to walk to school, which I am grateful for. I also use it for when I catch the train to and from rowing. When I am walking to the station, I am able to know what trains are coming so I can catch them.
Since having the apple watch, I have found myself becoming more active as I am striving to achieve the goals that it has set for me. Instead of sitting in front of the television, now I find myself walking my dog so it has not only benefitted myself. It has benefited my dog as well!
The apple watch has made me feel more comfortable within the society that is hearing and seeing. So I thank the Molly Watt trust committee so much and am so grateful that I was one of the lucky people to experience the benefits and support that the apple watch has provided me.

Monday, 27 November 2017 15:48

Charlotte's Applewatch

I was aged 14 when I was told I had Ushers Syndrome Type 2. I was devastated and my dreams for the future were gone in a single moment. Being faced with the bleak reality of slowly losing your sight would be hard for anyone, let alone a young teenager already struggling with typical teenage problems. As the years went by with the emotional rollercoaster of being registered visually impaired at 16 and then being registered as legally blind at age 19, I learnt how to be more optimistic as I grew tired of wallowing in self-pity and not taking opportunities while I still could see. I learnt more and more about the concept of accessibility and that I wasn’t as limited in my abilities as I once thought. I became more aware of the importance of accessibility to people like me, I got frustrated at the lack of it even in today’s modern era.
I have always been a fan of Apple products due to their settings, a whole subsection dedicated to accessibility with amazing features such as Magnifier, larger and bolder text and specific volume controls for hearing aids. Since the Molly Watt Trust has kindly given me an Apple iWatch Series 1, I have taken advantage of its array of features which has already made certain aspects in my day to day life so much easier. I recently took up running and it is much more convenient using my Apple iWatch which has a fitness activity app which helps me record my daily activity. If I have important incoming calls or texts when I’m out and about or running, then I can answer from my iWatch rather than getting out my iPhone which could easily be dropped. One of my favourite features would be the Extra-Large Watch Face which make it easier for users with low vision to see the time and means I can quickly glance at it when I am on the move rather than getting out my phone and squinting for the time.
Due to the Bluetooth connectivity between my iPhone and my iWatch, I can leave my iPhone charging and still go about my day with my iWatch as my calls and messages will also appear on my iWatch’s screen and I can answer them accordingly. Apple iWatch also includes a range of settings to meet the needs of people with a wide variety of sight loss not just RP. These includes Zoom, Grayscale, Reduce Transparency, Mono Audio and much more. These settings can also be controlled and altered through the Apple iWatch iPhone app.
The only downside with the iWatch is that it can drain a lot of battery life from my iPhone which means I have to charge both my iPhone and iWatch overnight but aside from that I think Apple has really pushed the boundaries of accessibility by designing their products to meet the needs of visually impaired users, the Apple iWatch Series 1 has ticked all the boxes for me.

 

Recent Blogs

Ultimately we can all be winners

Ultimately we can all be winners

This year saw me nominated for three awards, Young Digital Leader for Digital Leaders for the second time (Too old for that one again) Positive Role Model for Disability, National...

Read more...

Virgin Train #Fail

We were truly horrified to hear of Molly's recent expereince at London's Euston Station and it must never happen again:   I travelled from Maidenhead to London Euston to catch a train...

Read more...

Helen diagnosis 'I felt my world fel…

Helen diagnosis 'I felt my world fell apart'

My name is Helen Colson. I’m 29 years old & live in Southport, Merseyside. I was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa and as I am moderate-severely deaf, Ushers Syndrome last year.  It...

Read more...

Olivia's Usher Life - Last few month…

Olivia's Usher Life - Last few months of emotions

Hello Everyone! Would like to wish you all happy deaf blindness week! I’m so sorry that I haven’t posted in it feels like ages! But I’ve got soooo much to...

Read more...

Where did our journey with Usher Syn…

Where did our journey with Usher Syndrome begin?

Where does our story begin..... Alice (now 16) was born profoundly deaf. In Oct 17 at a routine eye test (Alice has always worn glasses) they picked up an issue...

Read more...

The evolution changing Usher Syndrom…

The evolution changing Usher Syndrome

Usher Syndrome is a strange thing, strangely it is evolving even though it hasn’t changed.  It remains a condition without a cure. There are variations in level of deafness, in level of...

Read more...

Whispers in the Dark

Whispers in the Dark

It’s never been easy. Having to scan the floor in front of you when walking down the street. Having to pre-plan the route to the nearest toilet in a restaurant...

Read more...

GAAD - Not if but how!

GAAD - Not if but how!

Indeed back in the 19th Century it was Helen Keller who stated “DEAFNESS SEPERATES US FROM PEOPLE AND BLINDNESS SEPERATES US FROM THINGS”. Back then she was right, she lived...

Read more...

Equal access to sound for all

Equal access to sound for all

Today is ‘Rare Disease Day -2019’ So I decided on a blog about hearing aid technology that can and does enhance lives.  This http://www.nciua.org.uk/latest-new/ was brought to my attention several weeks ago. ...

Read more...